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International Encyclopedia of Adolescence

In pre-industrial societies, people moved from childhood to adulthood directly, getting married and going to work early in life. Although this still holds true for many cultures, in countries such as the USA or Japan, adolescence has become a specific stage of life, where young people are cultural trendsetters and market drivers.

The International Encyclopedia of Adolescence is an exhaustive socio-cultural survey of young people around the world. The focus is cultural and historical, and the work offers a rarely found worldwide perspective. Entries are compiled by experts from many fields of study, including anthropology, history, psychology, and sociology.

Unlike existing works, the Encyclopedia does not stress biological or psycho-pathological issues. It addresses myths and realities of adolescence by looking at the actual life of young people in regions as varied as Iran, India, France, the USA, or Japan. It also explains how teen cultures have developed in some countries and how young people deal with the conflicts between tradition and modernity in others. Country coverage examines cultural beliefs, gender, personal and cultural identity, relationships (familial), friends and peers, love and sexuality, education, work, media, problems, and outlook for the future, plus topics particular to the culture or region discussed.

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Handbook of Latin American Studies

Beginning with volume 41 (1979), the University of Texas Press became the publisher of the Handbook of Latin American Studies, the most comprehensive annual bibliography in the field. Compiled by the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress and annotated by a corps of more than 130 specialists in various disciplines, the Handbook alternates from year to year between social sciences and humanities. The Handbook annotates works on Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and the Guianas, Spanish South America, and Brazil, as well as materials covering Latin America as a whole. Most of the subsections are preceded by introductory essays that serve as biannual evaluations of the literature and research under way in specialized areas. The Handbook of Latin American Studies is the oldest continuing reference work in the field. Dolores Moyano Martin, of the Library of Congress Hispanic Division, has been the editor since 1977, and P. Sue Mundell was assistant editor from 1994 to 1998. The subject categories for Volume 56 are as follows: ∑ Electronic Resources for the Humanities ∑ Art ∑ History (including ethnohistory) ∑ Literature (including translations from the Spanish and Portuguese) ∑ Philosophy: Latin American Thought ∑ Music

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The Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature

This extraordinary one-volume guide to the modern literatures of China, Japan, and Korea is the definitive reference work on the subject in the English language. With more than one hundred articles that show how a host of authors and literary movements have contributed to the general literary development of their respective countries, this companion is an essential starting point for the study of East Asian literatures. Comprehensive thematic essays introduce each geographical section with historical overviews and surveys of persistent themes in the literature examined, including nationalism, gender, family relations, and sexuality.

Following the thematic essays are the individual entries: over forty for China, over fifty for Japan, and almost thirty for Korea, featuring everything from detailed analyses of the works of Tanizaki Jun’ichiro and Murakami Haruki, to far-ranging explorations of avant-garde fiction in China and postwar novels in Korea. Arrayed chronologically, each entry is self-contained, though extensive cross-referencing affords readers the opportunity to gain a more synoptic view of the work, author, or movement. The unrivaled opportunities for comparative analysis alone make this unique companion an indispensable reference for anyone interested in the burgeoning field of Asian literature.

Although the literatures of China, Japan, and Korea are each allotted separate sections, the editors constantly kept an eye open to those writers, works, and movements that transcend national boundaries. This includes, for example, Chinese authors who lived and wrote in Japan; Japanese authors who wrote in classical Chinese; and Korean authors who write in Japanese, whether under the colonial occupation or because they are resident in Japan. The waves of modernization can be seen as reaching each of these countries in a staggered fashion, with eddies and back-flows between them then complicating the picture further. This volume provides a vivid sense of this dynamic interplay.