579414ca7ae2a_gbooks

Caroline Cooney

Cooney’s large body of work for adolescents defies easy classification. She has written award-winning adventure, suspense, romance, family, mystery, and historical fiction, as well as action-driven horror stories and a time-travel trilogy. Her purpose in some books, most notably horror like The Perfume, is just to encourage reluctant readers to enjoy literature. However, in her most serious and artistic books, Cooney relies on a source that is likely to surprise her readers: biblical stories and parables. For example, readers can find the seed of the idea that eventually became Whatever Happened to Janie in the story of King Solomon’s wisdom when he was asked to decide which of two women, both of whom claimed to be mother of an infant, should be recognized as the true mother. The parable of the Good Samaritan provides a backdrop in several of Cooney’s most successful novels. Cooney’s understated use of biblical stories, and the way her Christian faith subtly informs her fiction, are explored in the book. The organization of the text reflects Cooney’s major fiction categories: the “Janie” mysteries, romances, catastrophe novels, horror and suspense novels, the time travel trilogy, and her historical fiction. Representative books are discussed in detail within each chapter. Although most of the text is devoted to critical analysis of her literary work, and of the intersection of fiction and faith in her novels, Cooney’s biography is also presented within the frame of her life as a single mother of grown children. The influences of her talents as an organist who played regularly for her church, the lessons she has learned from her children when they were teenagers, and life experiences that have led her to consider issues of race and gender, are examples of issues that are discussed. For children’s and YA libraries and students of children’s literature.

579413c53e29a_gbooks

Comparative Children’s Literature

WINNER OF THE 2007 CHLA BOOK AWARD!

Children’s literature has transcended linguistic and cultural borders since books and magazines for young readers were first produced, with popular books translated throughout the world.

Emer O’Sullivan traces the history of comparative children’s literature studies, from the enthusiastic internationalism of the post-war period – which set out from the idea of a supra-national world republic of childhood – to modern comparative criticism. Drawing on the scholarship and children’s literature of many cultures and languages, she outlines the constituent areas that structure the field, including contact and transfer studies, intertextuality studies, intermediality studies and image studies. In doing so, she provides the first comprehensive overview of this exciting new research area. Comparative Children’s Literature also links the fields of narratology and translation studies, to develop an original and highly valuable communicative model of translation.

Taking in issues of children’s ‘classics’, the canon and world literature for children, Comparative Children’s Literature reveals that this branch of literature is not as genuinely international as it is often fondly assumed to be and is essential reading for those interested in the consequences of globalization on children’s literature and culture.

5794131df3a39_gbooks

The Writersnet Anthology of Prose

The WritersNet Anthology of Prose reverses the trend of the publishing industry expanding onto the Internet. What began as an on-line evaluation and editing workshop on the WritersNet website turned this trend on its head when the best of the material submitted by writers across four continents, both published and unpublished, both previous best-sellers and those seeking their first appearance in print, was published in this two-volume anthology. This project not only showcases the widely diverse talent of new and established writers and has established a new common-purpose dimension of community among the writers participating in WritersNet, but it also serves the community at large, as all profits above production costs are being donated to the Salvation Army in remembrance of the events of 9/11.

The resulting collection of thirty-one essays and three children’s short stories by twenty-eight separate authors provided in this volume two of the anthology, WritersNet Anthology of Prose: Nonfiction and Children’s Literature, is much more eclectic than is normal with such works. These works defy the normal “common thread in content” rule. You can find something here to entertain you—and to make you ponder—no matter what your reading pleasure. Explore and enjoy.