5794156704a90_gbooks

Readers’ Advisory Service in the Public Library

Do you have anything else like this? In public libraries, reference librarians are often called on to make recommendations to readers, sometimes in genres that they don’t personally read. Learning how to frame a discussion and articulate the appeal of a book, author, or genre marks the essence of a successful readers’ advisor. Readers’ advisory is defined as, patron-oriented library service for adult fiction readers, according to Saricks, a noted expert on the subject. In the completely revised third edition of Readers’ Advisory Service for Public Libraries, Saricks updates this critically acclaimed how-to guide, making it more helpful than ever. As reference librarians seek support in guiding adult readers, they’ve come to trust this authoritative resource. lists, identifying what else is like a favorite book; Practical guidelines for conducting the advisory interview so it’s a comfortable exchange; Confidence-boosting tactics for drawing on reviews to make recommendations; Methods for incorporating nonfiction into the discussion; More resources and online tools; Using the proven strategies in this newly updated, back-to-basics overview, librarians providing readers’ advisory services will find the answers they need to help customers make appropriate choices.

57941533783d0_gbooks

Serving Teens Through Readers’ Advisory

Getting teens to read for fun is the ultimate challenge, yet research shows that it improves skills in grammar and spelling while expanding vocabularies. Accessible and encouraging for beginners and an informative refresher for those more experienced, this hands-on expert guide addresses teens’ unique needs with practical tools that help readers’ advisors: build winning relationships with teens and connect on their terms; communicate with this hard-to-reach audience to create a positive RA experience; use proven questions and techniques to uncover teens’ worldview; get up to speed fast using sure bets lists; and deal with challenges of controversial topics, homework reading, and recommending by proxy. Filled with concrete advice, this ready-to-use resource supports public librarians as well as middle and high school library media specialists and library support staff who want to make an impact with teens at a critical time in their lives.

5794140cf0e24_gbooks

CUES

Calling for structured interaction between students and books, Leonard specifies how teachers and media specialists can collaborate to create a library media-centered program that develops the talents of all K-6 students. The ultimate goal is to encourage reading and build reading, comprehension, questioning, and thinking skills. Models, groupings, strategies, and materials are suggested in a grade-appropriate scope and sequence. The latest theories about the process of education, thinking, multiple intelligences, how children learn (individually and cooperatively), as well as effective grouping and teaching strategies for differentiation are discussed. The book also has sample lessons and scenarios drawn from the author’s experience. Grades K-6.