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The Official Encyclopedia of Manchester United

This new and absorbing encyclopedia is the definitive work on the story of Manchester United. With all the facts and figures, league tables, over 130,000 words of text and more than 400 photographs throughout, it provides the most comprehensive and authoritative overview of the club. Including a season-by-season look at United’s progress, with special features on the Reds’ trophy-winning campaigns, this book tells the complete story of the Red Devils. Of special value is a section profiling all the club’s most significant players throughout its history.

With timecharts, easy-to-follow design features and many other special entries, this book is an essential purchase for any fan.

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Airman

Conor Broekhart was born to fly.
It is the 1890s, and Conor and his family live on the sovereign Saltee Islands, off the Irish coast. Conor spends his days studying the science of flight with his tutor and exploring the castle with the king’s daughter, Princess Isabella. But the boy’s idyllic life changes forever the day he discovers a deadly conspiracy against the king. When Conor intervenes, he is branded a traitor and thrown into jail on the prison island of Little Saltee. There, he has to fight for his life, as he and the other prisoners are forced to mine for diamonds in inhumane conditions.
There is only one way to escape Little Saltee, and that is to fly. So Conor passes the solitary months by scratching drawings of flying machines into the prison walls. The months turn into years, but eventually the day comes when Conor must find the courage to trust his revolutionary designs and take to the skies.

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The Kaiser’s Last Kiss

A fictionalised account of the Kaiser Wilhelm’s last years in Nazi-occupied Holland.It is 1940 and the exiled Kaiser is living in Holland, at his palace Huis Doorn.The old German king spends his days chopping logs and musing on what might have been.When the Nazis invade Holland, the Kaiser’s Dutch staff are replaced by SS guards, led by young, eager Untersturmfuhrer Krebbs, and an unlikely relationship develops between the king and his keeper. While they agree on the rightfulness of German expansion and on holding the country’s Jewish population accountable for all ills, they disagree on the solutions. Krebbs’s growing attraction and love affair with Akki, a Jewish maid in the house, further undermines his belief in Nazism. But as the tides of war roll around them, all three find themselves increasingly compromised and gravely at risk.This subtle, tender novel borrows heavily from real history and events, but remains a work of superlative, literary fiction.Through Judd’s depiction of the Lear-like Kaiser and the softening of brutal Krebbs, the novel draws unique parallels between Germany at the turn of the 20th century and Hitler’s Germany.

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The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines

The first of three volumes charting the history of the Modernist Magazine in Britain, North America, and Europe, this collection offers the first comprehensive study of the wide and varied range of ‘little magazines’ which were so instrumental in introducing the new writing and ideas that came to constitute literary and artistic modernism in the UK and Ireland. In thirty-seven chapters covering over eighty magazines expert contributors investigate the inner dynamics and economic and intellectual conditions that governed the life of these fugitive but vibrant publications. We learn of the role of editors and sponsors, the relation of the arts to contemporary philosophy and politics, the effects of war and economic depression and of the survival in hard times of radical ideas and a belief in innovation. The chapters are arranged according to historical themes with accompanying contextual introductions, and include studies of the New Age, Blast, the Egoist and the Criterion, New Writing, New Verse , and Scrutiny as well as of lesser known magazines such as the Evergreen, Coterie, the Bermondsey Book, the Mask, Welsh Review, the Modern Scot, and the Bell. To return to the pages of these magazines returns us a world where the material constraints of costs and anxieties over censorship and declining readerships ran alongside the excitement of a new poem or manifesto. This collection therefore confirms the value of magazine culture to the field of modernist studies; it provides a rich and hitherto under-examined resource which both brings to light the debate and dialogue out of which modernism evolved and helps us recover the vitality and potential of that earlier discussion.

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The Irish Voice in America

In this study, Charles Fanning has written the first general account of the origins and development of a literary tradition among American writers of Irish birth or background who have explored the Irish immigrant or ethnic experience in works of fiction. The result is a portrait of the evolving fictional self-consciousness of an immigrant group over a span of 250 years.

Fanning traces the roots of Irish-American writing back to the eighteenth century and carries it forward through the traumatic years of the Famine to the present time with an intensely productive period in the twentieth century beginning with James T. Farrell. Later writers treated in depth include Edwin O’Connor, Elizabeth Cullinan, Maureen Howard, and William Kennedy. Along the way he places in the historical record many all but forgotten writers, including the prolific Mary Ann Sadlier. The Irish Voice in America is not only a highly readable contribution to American literary history but also a valuable reference to many writers and their works.

For this second edition, Fanning has added a chapter that covers the fiction of the past decade. He argues that contemporary writers continue to draw on Ireland as a source and are important chroniclers of the modern American experience.

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Dictionary of Nineteenth-century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland

DNCJ is a comprehensive representation of diverse facets of the industry provides a snapshot of the press, from journalist to reader. Its 1630 entries, contributed by an international team of experts and researchers,
reflect the full range of the press, including art, children, illustration, literature, religion, sports, politics, local and regional titles, satire, and trade journals. DNCJ includes newspapers and periodicals in England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

DNCJ contains entries on journals, journalists, illustrators, editors, publishers, proprietors, printers, and topics such as advertising, frequency of publication, magazine day, printing presses, readership, social science and the press, and war and journalism. It has been shaped by the editors and a team of thirteen associate editors in
collaboration with the research community. Authoritative new research, extensive indexes, a wide-ranging bibliography and a chronology enhance the coverage of this burgeoning field.

A co-edition with The British Library

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Writer’s Market 2010

THE MOST TRUSTED GUIDE TO GETTING PUBLISHED

Written by writers for writers and backed by 89 years of authority, Writer’s Market is the #1 resource for helping writers sell their work. Used by both seasoned professionals and writers new to the publishing world, Writer’s Market has helped countless writers transform their love of writing from a hobby into a career. Nowhere else but in the 2010 Writer’s Market will you find the most comprehensive and reliable information you need. This new edition includes: Complete, up-to-date contact information and submission guidelines for more than 3,500 market listings, including literary agents, book publishers, magazines, newspapers, production companies, theaters, greeting card companies, and more. Informative interviews, helpful tips and instructional articles on the business of writing. The "How Much Should I Charge?" pay rate charts for professional freelancers. Sample good and bad queries in the "Query Letter Clinic." Easy-to-use format and tabbed pages so you can quickly locate the information you need!

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The Routledge Guide to Modern English Writing

In 1963 President John F. Kennedy was shot, Sylvia Plath published The Bell Jar, and the Beatles were in their prime. This was a changing world, which British and Irish writers both contributed to and reflected in drama, poetry and prose.
The Routledge Guide to Modern English Writing tells the story of British and Irish writing from 1963 to the present. From the first performance of Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead in the 1960s to lad novels and Chick Lit in the twenty-first century, the authors guide the reader through the major writers, genres and developments in English writing over the past forty years. Providing an in-depth overview of the main genres and extensive treatment of a wide range of writers including Philip Larkin, Ted Hughes, Angela Carter, Benjamin Zephaniah and Nick Hornby, this highly readable handbook also offers notes on language issues, quotations from selected works, a timeline and a guide to other works.
Written by the authors of The Routledge History of Literature in English (second edition, 2001), The Routledge Guide to Modern English Writing is essential reading for all readers of contemporary writing.