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The Rolling Stones

One of Heinlein’s Best-Loved Works. By “One of the most influential writers in American literature.” —The New York Times Book Review.

The rollicking adventures of the Stone Family on a tour of the Solar System. It all statred when the twins, Castor and Pollux Stone, decided that life on the Lunar colony was too dull and decided to buy their own spaceship and go into business for themselves. Their father thought that was a fine, idea, except that he and Grandma Hazel bought the spaceship and the whole Stone Family were on their way out into the far reaches of the Solar System, with stops on Mars(where the twins got a lesson in the interplanetary economics of bicycles and the adorable little critters called flatcats who, it turned out, bred like rabbits; or perhaps, Tribbles….), out to the asteroids, where  Mrs. Stone, an M.D., was needed to treat a dangerous outbreak of disease, even further out, to Titan and beyond.

Unforgettable Heinlein characters on an unforgettable adventure.

 

“Not only America’s premier writer of speculative fiction, but the greatest writer of such fiction in the world”.  

  –   Stephen King

Comprehensive Teacher’s Guide available.

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International Encyclopedia of Adolescence

In pre-industrial societies, people moved from childhood to adulthood directly, getting married and going to work early in life. Although this still holds true for many cultures, in countries such as the USA or Japan, adolescence has become a specific stage of life, where young people are cultural trendsetters and market drivers.

The International Encyclopedia of Adolescence is an exhaustive socio-cultural survey of young people around the world. The focus is cultural and historical, and the work offers a rarely found worldwide perspective. Entries are compiled by experts from many fields of study, including anthropology, history, psychology, and sociology.

Unlike existing works, the Encyclopedia does not stress biological or psycho-pathological issues. It addresses myths and realities of adolescence by looking at the actual life of young people in regions as varied as Iran, India, France, the USA, or Japan. It also explains how teen cultures have developed in some countries and how young people deal with the conflicts between tradition and modernity in others. Country coverage examines cultural beliefs, gender, personal and cultural identity, relationships (familial), friends and peers, love and sexuality, education, work, media, problems, and outlook for the future, plus topics particular to the culture or region discussed.

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Science Fiction in the Real World

No ordinary critic, Norman Spinrad explicates, celebrates, and sometimes excoriates science fiction from the privileged perspective of an artist armed with intimate knowledge of the craft of fiction and even of the writers themselves.

In these 13 essays, Spinrad urges science fiction as a genre to reach its potential. He divides the essays—new works written specifically for this book combined with those that appeared in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine—into five sections: “Literature and Genre: A Critical Overview,” in which Spinrad establishes his critical standards; “Alternate Media: Visual Translations,” a discussion of comic books and books made into movies; “Modes of Content: Hard SF, Cyberpunk, and the Space Visionaries”; “Psychopolitics and Science Fiction: Heroes—True and Otherwise”; and “Masters of the Form: Careers in Profile,” discussions of Sturgeon, Vonnegut, Ballard, and Dick.

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Popular Texts in English

This book comprises a collection of articles devoted to the academic study of popular texts in English. Authors analyse genres which had been habitually looked down on by canonical approaches to literature and art. They take into serious consideration forms like horror literature, the gothic, fantasy, de-tective fiction, science fiction, best-sellers, films and television series of different kinds… among some other representations of what conservative scholars had been considering as marginal. The referential richness of the perspectives reflected here demonstrates that popular texts can be enjoyable for readers and audiences, at the same time that they can be significant in order to reach a better understanding of our culture and ourselves at the beginning of a new millennium.

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Queen Zixi of Ix

Another classic of juvenile literature from the creator of The Wizard of Oz, this enchanting tale recounts an evil queen’s attempts to steal a magic cloak. L. Frank Baum packs this adventure with his customary humor, inventive fantasies, and captivating characters. Includes all 90 of the original illustrations by Frederick Richardson.

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Caroline Cooney

Cooney’s large body of work for adolescents defies easy classification. She has written award-winning adventure, suspense, romance, family, mystery, and historical fiction, as well as action-driven horror stories and a time-travel trilogy. Her purpose in some books, most notably horror like The Perfume, is just to encourage reluctant readers to enjoy literature. However, in her most serious and artistic books, Cooney relies on a source that is likely to surprise her readers: biblical stories and parables. For example, readers can find the seed of the idea that eventually became Whatever Happened to Janie in the story of King Solomon’s wisdom when he was asked to decide which of two women, both of whom claimed to be mother of an infant, should be recognized as the true mother. The parable of the Good Samaritan provides a backdrop in several of Cooney’s most successful novels. Cooney’s understated use of biblical stories, and the way her Christian faith subtly informs her fiction, are explored in the book. The organization of the text reflects Cooney’s major fiction categories: the “Janie” mysteries, romances, catastrophe novels, horror and suspense novels, the time travel trilogy, and her historical fiction. Representative books are discussed in detail within each chapter. Although most of the text is devoted to critical analysis of her literary work, and of the intersection of fiction and faith in her novels, Cooney’s biography is also presented within the frame of her life as a single mother of grown children. The influences of her talents as an organist who played regularly for her church, the lessons she has learned from her children when they were teenagers, and life experiences that have led her to consider issues of race and gender, are examples of issues that are discussed. For children’s and YA libraries and students of children’s literature.