The Golden Crystal

In 1791, two men began planning the layout for the nation’s capital city. One is shunned and resigns in disgrace, and the other is all but forgotten. Years later, an original copy of the plans long thought to have been destroyed is found, with hastily marked notations by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington. During the second World War, American military scientists discover some fascinating properties of the hydrogen atom and its link to an ancient mystical number. The exact findings are never published, but a national laboratory is built in 1943 to further their research in covert silence. America is told it is a defense project, code-named The Manhattan Project. An ego-maniacal entrepreneur and his company, Vilocorp, will stop at nothing to build the perfect human specimen. His firm’s research has been getting closer every day, but they seem to have uncovered a horrific, ancient secret that has been locked away for thousands of years. Now, it’s up to two men to understand the mystery surrounding the events and ancient symbolism before Vilocorp unleashes a hellish fury upon the earth; one that hasn t been seen for ages…


The Death of Literature

A distinguished writer and scholar explores literature’s ‘crisis of confidence’. Writing in an anecdotal and witty style, Alvin Herman relates the death of literature to a variety of agents – among them television, computer technology, legal issues of copyright and plagiarism, faculty politics, and literary criticism itself – and ponders whether literature’s vitality can be restored in the changing circumstances of late twentieth-century culture.


Critical Assumptions

This book is an historical survey of some important theories of literary criticism, which is designed to introduce more advanced students of English and other European literature to the nature and origin of these theories and ultimately to help them clarify their own attitudes to literature. Professor Ruthven’s approach is to bring together and analyse examples of the way in which major writers and critics have dealt with the critical issues raised by different kinds of writing. He emphasizes throughout the variety of critical stances taken at different times in response to the challenge posed by highly original works and he draws on a large number of instances from all the major periods of English literature. The examination of the historical material presented here should encourage students of English, as well as other modern European literatures, to recognise and re-appraise their own critical assumptions.


New York State

Circle the core of the Big Apple, don a raincoat at one of the world’s natural wonders, check out Shoeless Joe Jackson’s shoes at a shrine to America’s favorite pastime, see where 12 million immigrants first set foot on U.S. soil, or whoosh down Olympic ski slopes in the Adironacks —Fodor’s New York State, 1st Editionoffers all these experiences and more! Our local writers have traveled throughout this state to find the best hotels, restaurants, attractions and activities to prepare you for a journey of stunning variety. Before you leave for your trip be sure to pack your Fodor’s guide to ensure you don’t miss a thing.

The San Francisco Chroniclesums it up best —”Fodor’s guides are saturated with information.”

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With Fodor’s you getmuchmore than a guidebook–we make it easy for you to customize your dream vacation.

Visitwww.fodors.comto find up-to-date travel bargains, mini-guides to worldwide destinations, information on local festivals, dazzling drives, maps, vacation planning tips and much more!

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Debating the Canon

Over the past two decades, the debate over the ‘Great Books’ has been one of the key public controversies concerning the cultural content of higher education. Debating the Canon provides a primary-source overview of these ongoing arguments. Many of these contributions to this debate have achieved ‘canonical’ status themselves; through the focus on the canon, the full spectrum of approaches to literary studies can be seen in the essays. Therefore, this collection places the recent debate within a larger context of literary criticism’s development of a canon, going back to the eighteenth century.


What Shall I Read Next?

Originally published in 1953, What Shall I Read Next? lists nearly 2000 works published after 1900, with the compiler’s own appreciatory comments on selected items. It was a companion volume to Mr Seymour Smith’s English Library. Both books are published on behalf of the National Book League. In his introduction, explaining the scope and purpose of the book, Mr Seymour Smith wrote: ‘Some will find it useful merely as a shopping list, reminding them of books they know something about already, and serving as a remembrancer. To others, and particularly to younger readers, it may introduce books which have so far escaped their notice. It is hoped, too, that for booksellers and librarians it will have a practical use as a desk-book, for answering enquiries, for serving as a check list for stock, and for use as a reference book when memory fails’.