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French Global

Recasting French literary history in terms of the cultures and peoples that interacted within and outside of France’s national boundaries, this volume offers a new way of looking at the history of a national literature, along with a truly global and contemporary understanding of language, literature, and culture.

The relationship between France’s national territory and other regions of the world where French is spoken and written (most of them former colonies) has long been central to discussions of “Francophonie.” Boldly expanding such discussions to the whole range of French literature, the essays in this volume explore spaces, mobilities, and multiplicities from the Middle Ages to today. They rethink literary history not in terms of national boundaries, as traditional literary histories have done, but in terms of a global paradigm that emphasizes border crossings and encounters with “others.” Contributors offer new ways of reading canonical texts and considering other texts that are not part of the traditional canon. By emphasizing diverse conceptions of language, text, space, and nation, these essays establish a model approach that remains sensitive to the specificities of time and place and to the theoretical concerns informing the study of national literatures in the twenty-first century.

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The Town

Having made his mark in Frenchman’s Bend, ambitious Flem Snopes sets his sights on the town of Jefferson. Rising up through the ranks of Jefferson’s bank, Flem uses his power to influence life in the town and control his unruly family. With the same memorable characters from The Hamlet, The Town is the second book in William Faulkner’s Snopes trilogy and continues his commentary on post-war economic troubles in the American South.

Published 17 years after The Hamlet, The Town marked Faulkner’s return to Snopes’s story, which he completed with The Mansion. While a self-contained novel, The Hamlet’s meaning and social commentary is deepened when read in conjunction with the other Snopes books.

HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital form, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

“Turning the envelope over, his hand trembling, Harry saw a purple wax seal bearing a coat of arms; a lion, an eagle, a badger and a snake surrounding a large letter ‘H’.”

Harry Potter has never even heard of Hogwarts when the letters start dropping on the doormat at number four, Privet Drive. Addressed in green ink on yellowish parchment with a purple seal, they are swiftly confiscated by his grisly aunt and uncle. Then, on Harry’s eleventh birthday, a great beetle-eyed giant of a man called Rubeus Hagrid bursts in with some astonishing news: Harry Potter is a wizard, and he has a place at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. An incredible adventure is about to begin!

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Civil War America, 1850 To 1875

Spanning the decades from colonial times to modern day, the Almanacs of American Life series delves into the daily lives of the American people. The broad range of information includes the prices of everyday items in colonial America, medical practices during the Revolutionary period, the annual salaries of teachers during Victorian times, the number of Americans who had indoor plumbing during the early part of the twentieth century, and much more.

This comprehensive series provides a solid foundation for imaginative research and critical thought, making it an ideal resource for students working on American history assignments. Each volume uses statistics and tables that offer an unprecedented amount of intriguing facts. Archival illustrations such as maps, photographs, cartoons, and advertisements visually document each era and invite researchers to browse through these volumes again and again.

Each book in the series provides students with information covering:
— Climate, geography, and natural history
— The economy, agriculture, industry, professions, trade, and finance
— Population: size and character, family data, marriage age, birth rate, and immigration rate
— Politics and government
— Diet and health, mortality rates, and life span
— Arts and letters
— Popular culture
— and more.

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Billboard

In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world’s premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest music, video, gaming, media, digital and mobile entertainment issues and trends.

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The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes

Which books did the British working classes read–and how did they read them? How did they respond to canonical authors, penny dreadfuls, classical music, school stories, Shakespeare, Marx, Hollywood movies, imperialist propaganda, the Bible, the BBC, the Bloomsbury Group? What was the quality of their classroom education? How did they educate themselves? What was their level of cultural literacy: how much did they know about politics, science, history, philosophy, poetry, and sexuality? Who were the proletarian intellectuals, and why did they pursue the life of the mind? These intriguing questions, which until recently historians considered unanswerable, are addressed in this book. Using innovative research techniques and a vast range of unexpected sources, The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes tracks the rise and decline of the British autodidact from the pre-industrial era to the twentieth century. It offers a new method for cultural historians–an “audience history” that recovers the responses of readers, students, theatergoers, filmgoers, and radio listeners. Jonathan Rose provides an intellectual history of people who were not expected to think for themselves, told from their perspective. He draws on workers’ memoirs, oral history, social surveys, opinion polls, school records, library registers, and newspapers. Through its novel and challenging approach to literary history, the book gains access to politics, ideology, popular culture, and social relationships across two centuries of British working-class experience.