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Contemporary Iraqi Fiction

The first anthology of its kind in the West, Contemporary Iraqi Fiction gathers work from sixteen Iraqi writers, all translated from Arabic. Shedding a bright light on the rich diversity of Iraqi experience, Shakir Mustafa has included selections by Iraqi women, Iraqi Jews now living in Israel, and Christians and Muslims living both in Iraq and abroad.
While each voice is distinct, they are united in writing about a homeland that has suffered under repression, censorship, war, and occupation. Many of the selections mirror these grim realities, forcing the writers to open up new narrative terrains and experiment with new forms. Muhammad Khodayyir’s surrealist portraits of his home city, Basra, in an excerpt from Basrayatha and the magical realism of Mayselun Hadi’s “Calendars” both offer powerful expressions of the absurdity of everyday life.
Themes range from childhood and family to war, political oppression, and interfaith relationships. Mustafa provides biographical sketches of the writers and an enlightening introduction chronicling the evolution of Iraqi fiction.

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Sudden Fiction

“We who love prose fiction love these miniature tales both to read and to write because they are so finite; so highly compressed and highly charged.” Joyce Carol Oates

“People who like to skip can’t skip in a three-page story.” Grace Paley

“The short-short story is an exercise in virtuosity that tightens the circle of mystery surrounding what we know.” John L’Heureux

“It can do in a page what a novel does in two hundred. It covers years in less time, time in almost no time. It wants to deliver us to where we were before we began. Its aim is restorative, to keep us young.” Mark Strand

“There are, in truth, more kinds of short-short stories than I ever knew of or imagined. Wonderful! I rejoice in the richness and variety of all these voices.” George Garrett

“This collection represents the richness and variety of American writers. The 70 pieces themselves–highly compressed, often tantalizing–display a multiplicity of modes and derive them a variety of traditions.” Publishers Weekly

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The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction

From the Publisher: Revised by celebrated novelist and short-fiction writer Richard Bausch, this edition continues to offer the most exciting blend of contemporary and classic short stories in a portable format. In this Shorter Seventh Edition, 72 stories by 68 authors are lightly supplemented by a general introduction, biographical notes, and essays written for the benefit of beginning writers.

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One World

This book is made up of twenty-three stories, each from a different author from across the globe. All belong to one world, united in their diversity and ethnicity. And together they have one aim: to involve and move the reader.

The range of authors takes in such literary greats as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Jhumpa Lahiri, and emerging authors such as Elaine Chiew, Petina Gappah, and Henrietta Rose-Innes.

The members of the collective are:

Elaine Chiew (Malaysia)
Molara Wood (Nigeria)
Jhumpa Lahiri (United States)
Martin A Ramos (Puerto Rico)
Lauri Kubutsile (Botswana)
Chika Unigwe (Nigeria)
Ravi Mangla (United States)
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Nigeria)
Skye Brannon (United States)
Jude Dibia (Nigeria)
Shabnam Nadiya (Bangladesh)
Petina Gappah (Zimbabwe)
Ivan Gabirel Reborek (Australia)
Vanessa Gebbie (Britain)
Emmanual Dipita Kwa (Cameroon)
Henrietta Rose-Innes (South Africa)
Lucinda Nelson Dhavan (India)
Adetokunbo Abiola (Nigeria)
Wadzanai Mhute (Zimbabwe)
Konstantinos Tzikas (Greece)
Ken Kamoche (Kenya)
Sequoia Nagamatsu (United States)
Ovo Adagha (Nigeria)

From the Introduction:

The concept of One World is often a multi-colored tapestry into which
sundry, if not contending patterns can be woven. for those of us who worked
on this project, ‘One World’ goes beyond the everyday notion of the globe
as a physical geographic entity. Rather, we understand it as a universal idea,
one that transcends national boundaries to comment on the most prevailing
aspects of the human condition.

This attempt to redefine the borders of the world we live in through the
short story recognizes the many conflicting issues of race, language, economy,
gender and ethnicity, which separate and limit us. We readily acknowledge,
however, that regardless of our differences or the disparities in our stories, we
are united by our humanity.

We invite the reader on a personal journey across continents, countries,
cultures and landscapes, to reflect on these beautiful, at times chaotic, renditions
on the human experience. We hope the reach of this path will transcend the
borders of each story, and perhaps function as an agent of change.

Welcome to our world.

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Punk Fiction

The legacy of punk rock is not merely musical but in fact can be found in an astounding variety of cultural media, including literature. From a cast of authors at the forefront of contemporary popular culture who have been—and continue to be—influenced by punk music, each tale in this dazzling collection of short stories has been inspired by a punk song. With contributors ranging from Kele Okereke of Bloc Party to Billy Bragg and Lydia Lunch, this is a fantastic and fascinating look at the dramatic impact punk rock has made on today’s artists, musicians, and authors.

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The Jazz Fiction Anthology

A gathering of the best jazz fiction from the 1920s to the present, this anthology includes 20th-century fiction by Eudora Welty, James Baldwin, Richard Yates, and others, plus important recent work from writers such as Yusef Komunyakaa, Xu Xi, and Amiri Baraka. Together these artists demonstrate the strong influence of jazz on fiction. That influence can be felt in prose styles shaped by jazz—freewheeling, dramatic, conversational, improvisatory; in stories of players and listeners searching for what lies beyond the music’s aesthetic power; and in the ambience of the jazz performance as captured by the written word. What sounds throughout these stories is the universal voice of humanity that is the essence of the music.

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The Oxford Book of American Short Stories

“How ironic,” Joyce Carol Oates writes in her introduction to this marvelous collection, “that in our age of rapid mass-production and the easy proliferation of consumer products, the richness and diversity of the American literary imagination should be so misrepresented in most anthologies.” Why, she asks, when writers such as Samuel Clemens, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Saul Bellow, and John Updike have among them written hundreds of short stories, do anthologists settle on the same two or three titles by each author again and again? “Isn’t the implicit promise of an anthology that it will, or aspires to, present something different, unexpected?”
In The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, Joyce Carol Oates offers a sweeping survey of American short fiction, in a collection of fifty-six tales that combines classic works with many “different, unexpected” gems, and that invites readers to explore a wealth of important pieces by women and minority writers. Some selections simply can’t be improved on, Oates admits, and she happily includes such time-honored works as Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle,” Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart,” and Hemingway’s “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place.” But alongside these classics, Oates introduces such little-known stories as Mark Twain’s “Cannibalism in the Cars,” a story that reveals a darker side to his humor (“That morning we had Morgan of Alabama for breakfast. He was one of the finest men I ever sat down to…a perfect gentleman, and singularly juicy”). From Melville come the juxtaposed tales “The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids,” of which Oates says, “Only Melville could have fashioned out of ‘real’ events…such harrowing and dreamlike allegorical fiction.” From Flannery O’Connor we find “A Late Encounter With the Enemy,” and from John Cheever, “The Death of Justina,” one of Cheever’s own favorites, though rarely anthologized. The reader will also delight in the range of authors found here, from Charles W. Chesnutt, Jean Toomer, and Sarah Orne Jewett, to William Carlos Williams, Kate Chopin, and Zora Neale Hurston. Contemporary artists abound, including Bharati Mukherjee and Amy Tan, Alice Adams and David Leavitt, Bobbie Ann Mason and Tim O’Brien, Louise Erdrich and John Edgar Wideman. Oates provides fascinating introductions to each writer, blending biographical information with her own trenchant observations about their work, plus a long introductory essay, in which she offers the fruit of years of reflection on a genre in which she herself is a master.
This then is a book of surprises, a fascinating portrait of American short fiction, as filtered through the sensibility of a major modern writer.

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Biologic Response Modifiers in Infectious Diseases, an Issue of Infectious Disease Clinics

Biologic response modifiers (BRMs) are substances that stimulate the body’s response to infection and disease.  The body naturally produces small amounts of these substances. Scientists can produce some of them in the laboratory in large amounts for use in treating infections and other diseases.  This issue reviews the use of BRMs to treat infectious diseases as well as the infectious complications of BRMs used to treat non-infectious diseases.  Articles on vaccines, antibodies, interferon, and other substances are included.